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Why it is important to Pigeon Proof solar panels

Skirting on a solar panel

Solar panels are the go-to product for families and businesses who want to reduce their energy bills and help make the environment cleaner through also reducing their carbon footprint.  However, they can attract our feathered friends who can cause issues, therefore pigeon proofing your solar panels is important.

Solar panels protect birds and other creates from the elements and are warm and safe place for birds and pigeons to build their nests. If owners don’t pigeon proof solar panels there could very well be several families of birds and all the associated noise, mess and serious damage issues that could put your Solar Panels at risk.

What Problems Are Caused By Pigeons Nesting And Roosting On A Roof?

Pigeons and birds can affect your Solar Panel System in several ways. We have described some of the potential problems that they can cause in the list below.

1. Without pigeon proofing, birds can reduce your Solar power efficiency

Firstly, Solar Panels work by taking the sunlight and converting it into energy, you can save excess produce in batteries. Anything that prevents the solar panels receiving all the sunlight will impact the solar power efficiency. Bird and Pigeon droppings, debris from nest-building, feathers and dirt can start to cover the solar panel surface. Therefore reduce the ability of the Solar Panel to generate energy for your home. The savings on energy bills that your Solar Panels provide will consequently reduce. It is particularly important to pigeon proof your solar panels if you are on a string inverter as shading can occur.

2. Birds Can Damage Your Solar Panels

Finally, Birds communicate by making squawking noises. These increase in volume and frequency when baby birds are born and during feeding times. If you live by the coast or in areas where seagulls are common, you will be familiar with the continual noises. You will also know that they can be territorial. Birds can even attack when they have young. So the need to pigeon proof solar panels, or indeed proof them from all birds is very apparent.

Pigeons on a roof without solar mesh

How To Protect Solar Panels From Pigeons And Birds

Many of our customer ask us “What is Pigeon proofing?” and we explain that it is a permanent barrier around the Solar Panels that prevents pigeons and other birds from being able to get underneath them and therefore being able to nest there.

What Happens When Pigeon Proofing Is Installed?

When we add pigeon proofing to existing solar panel systems we do the following:

  • Remove any existing nests and birds from underneath the Solar Panels so that no birds are left trapped beneath the solar panels.
  • Clean the Solar Panels and immediate roof area, including the surface of the panel to remove any droppings or remaining nesting material or detritus.
  • Install your pigeon proofing product of choice.

How Much Does It Cost To Pigeon Proof Solar Panels?

The price of bird proofing solar panels depends on the number of solar panels and the height of the building. It also depends on whether scaffolding will be required and the bird proofing product of choice.  We always recommend that our customers have solar panel pigeon proofing installed at the same time as the solar panel system.  This prevents additional costs later on.

What Types Of Solar Panel Bird Proofing Are There?

There are several bird proofing options available for people who are looking at having solar panels installed, the options fall into three categories:

1. Bird Mesh Wire

This is the perhaps the most common kind of Bird Proofing of Solar Panels that you will see on homeowners’ roofs. Bird Mesh Wire attaches to the perimeter of the Solar Panels. Much like how chicken wire, bird mesh stops the birds from gaining access to underneath the panels. This will not damage your roof or impact your solar panels in any way as they are attached with clips. These are designed specifically for use with solar panels and the ventilation of the panels remains unaffected. Correctly installed, bird mesh wire will not affect the manufacturer’s warranty.

Bird Mesh Wire for Solar Panels

2. Anti-Perch Spikes

These can be used in addition to the Bird Mesh Wire and prevent birds and pigeons from roosting or perching wherever they are installed. Anti-perch Spikes are widely installed on commercial properties such as shopping centres. They are a humane and a reliable way of preventing birds and pigeons from perching. Therefore they prevent all the associated droppings and mess. Anti-perch spikes are UV resistant and made of premium grade stainless steel and are slightly more expensive than installing Bird Mesh Wire.

Anti-perch spikes on solar panels

3. The Solar Skirt

The most modern and aesthetically pleasing of the pigeon proofing methods is the Solar Skirt. This is a matt black edging that covers the gap between the solar panels and the roof hiding any wires or fixings. The sleek black trim not only prevents birds from accessing the space beneath the solar panels but also helps with the build-up of detritus from birds and with water run-off. Solar Skirts are easy to install and unlike mesh don’t need to be clamped, folded and bent etc.

Solar panel skirting on a house

Ideally it is better to have pigeon proofing installed at the time your solar panels system is installed. If you are going to retrofit some, it is important to choose a company with experience at working at heights and removing birds and pigeons carefully when getting solar panel bird proofing installed. Hiring an inexperienced installer could result in damage to solar panels and the warranty being voided.

If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to contact us at 0800 001 6258 or complete our form for a Free, no-obligation Survey.

Don't hesitate to contact us

We are happy to answer any Solar questions you may have and also offer a free, no-obligation, solar quotation service.

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